On the Non-Diversity of Diversity and Inclusion

As universities continue to shift toward the endorsement of a social justice and equity-based agenda, academics are increasingly confronted with the need to be more inclusive and diverse in their teaching practice, module content, and modes of evaluation. We are told that this is desirable, typically without any real explanation or grounded argument for why […]

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Resistance Is Not Futile

Professors are speaking out against progressive dogma University faculties are reeling from an unrelenting bombardment of progressive artillery aimed at decimating American traditions and laws intended to protect free speech, academic freedom, and racial and gender impartiality. Expressing even modest dissent prompts escalating aggression from students, administrators, and others. Careers, the Fourteenth Amendment, civil rights […]

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Unmasking the Campaign against “White Supremacy Culture” in Science

A revealing article in the February 2022 issue of Frontiers in Communications provides tremendous insight into the roadmap that Critical Theory advocates are using to conquer STEM, the last academic sector still holding out against the long march through the institutions. Titled “Acknowledging and Supplanting White Supremacy Culture in Science Communication and STEM: The Role […]

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Another Hopeful Sign: Hiers v. Board of Regents

In my last piece, I covered the recent decision in Coalition for TJ v. Fairfax County School District, where the court declared that a new admissions process for a highly-regarded STEM-focused high school was unconstitutional, finding that scrapping the old merit-based process in favor of “racial balancing” (based on Kendian “equity” principles) was clearly illegal […]

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CDC Lowers Expectations for Child Development, Raising New Questions for Parents

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by RealClearEducation on March 9, 2022, and is republished here with permission. The CDC has changed its list of children’s developmental milestones for infants and young children, marking the first update of its kind since 2004. The move has generally been portrayed in the media as a positive adjustment, with claims that it […]

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A Gay Bar of Our Own

It is not a good time in today’s academy for those who prize truth. One false step, one off-hand remark, one “wrong” vote on the latest hare-brained DIE initiative, and it’s off to purgatory or worse. Even if found innocent of corrupting young minds by telling the truth, the very thought of facing a Kafkaesque […]

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Silencing Disfavored Speech

UC Hastings law students expose the intolerance of the race-obsessed Left As further evidence that the campus woke persist in trying to determine what may and may not be said on university campuses, activist students at UC Hastings College of Law shut down the appearance of conservative legal scholar Ilya Shapiro at a March 1st […]

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Marcus Foster: A Black Hero You’ve Never Heard Of

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by RealClearPublicAffairs on March 3, 2022, and is republished here with permission. As part of its domination of cultural institutions, the far left decides who gets anointed as heroes. That leaves some of the greatest Americans forgotten, their lessons ignored. So another Black History Month has passed without a national recognition […]

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NAS by the Numbers

Numbers are in the air we breathe, even thicker than the Omicron variant it seems. Though it’s become passé to mention the COVID case count (53,000 last week, for anyone who’s still interested), one can instead cite 1.4 million (Ukrainian refugees), over 14 million (illegal aliens residing in the United States), 7.5% (US annual inflation), […]

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How Princeton Eviscerated Its Free Speech Rule and Covered It Up

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by RealClearPolitics on March 5, 2022, and is republished here with permission. In July 2020, a Princeton University professor, Joshua Katz, wrote an article containing provocative language that generated controversy on campus. While voicing strong disagreement with that language, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber clearly and publicly stated a few days later […]

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“Test-Blind” Is Another Tool for Discrimination

In recent years, many higher education institutions have abandoned standardized testing in their admissions processes or made these tests optional, arguing that SAT or ACT scores do not reliably project student performance and that these tests have built-in biases against underrepresented minorities (URMs). As of February 9, 2022, over 1,820 accredited U.S. colleges and universities […]

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The Lunacy of “Latinx”

Have you noticed how frequently students, and the general public for that matter, are asked to provide their ethnic or racial identity? All you have to do is fill out an online survey after making a purchase at the bookstore, and you will quickly be barraged with queries about your ethnicity. My usual practice is […]

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Democratic Students Are Never Satisfied

At Sarah Lawrence College, protesting about various perceived injustices is something of a campus pastime. When I discuss these demonstrations with my students, I warn them that the progressives behind them will never be satisfied, as their goals are constantly shifting and are often unclear. Leftists frequently promote narratives of harm and victimization and rarely […]

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Coalition for TJ v. Fairfax County School Board: The Shape of Things to Come?

In the last few years, academia has utterly embraced the concept of “equity” as articulated by Ibram X. Kendi; i.e., that if a particular identity group is statistically under- or over-represented in anything, the reason for the imbalance is indisputably systemic discrimination, and thus positive discrimination to correct the imbalance is not only proper but […]

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The DIE Industry’s Iron Rice Bowl Under Attack

It may have taken decades, but thanks to an upcoming Supreme Court case, American universities may soon be legally required to end racial preferences. At least that’s what many hope. Unfortunately, even if the Supreme Court bans racial preferences, the battle will hardly end. It may even become more acrimonious. One should recall what transpired […]

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Gang Chen, the China Initiative, and Open-Borders Academia

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by The Spectator World on February 19, 2022 and is crossposted here with permission. In January, the Department of Justice dropped charges against Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Gang Chen, a mechanical engineer accused of concealing illicit ties to the Chinese government early last year. United States Attorney Rachael Rollins said regarding the decision, […]

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No Place for Hate

Earlier this month, the Anti-Defamation League released an “interim definition” of racism, after its 2020 definition was widely criticized. That earlier definition held that racism is the “marginalization and/or oppression of people of color based on a socially constructed racial hierarchy that privileges white people.” Of course, if this were accurate, countless instances of racial […]

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Déjà Vu All Over Again at Harvard

Its discrimination against Asians mirrors its treatment of Jews, but for different reasons On January 24th, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case, Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard University, which not only has profound implications for the future of affirmative action in college admissions but also recalls an ignoble part of Harvard’s history […]

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When Ethnic Studies Education Violates the Law: California’s Guardrails

This is not an article about censorship. It is an article about critical thinking—framed within legislated guardrails. Boundaries are important in elementary and secondary education, more so than in higher education. We immediately think of age-appropriate materials, but there is also the more difficult issue of how we ought to frame education. At some point, […]

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Why Campus Craziness Never Seems to End

In 1986, economist Herbert Stein proposed what is now known as Stein’s Law: “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.” This may have been true 35 years ago, but we’d be hard-pressed to apply this law to today’s colleges and universities. The parade of crackpot ideas is unending, and one can only wonder […]

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