True North

The nation’s 250 Anniversary is only 29 months away.  The National Association of Scholars is commemorating the events that led up to the Second Continental Congress officially adopting the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. This is the forth installment of the series. Find the third installment here.  Joe Biden — Photo by Gage […]

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Academic Freedom is Not an Academic License

Academic freedom is constantly referred to by faculty and administration. It is often used as a proxy for free speech, and a free speech absolutism where “anything goes.” It serves as an academic totem; as an indulgence, that faculty seem to consider beyond any boundaries of definition or responsibility. Limiting academic freedom would delimit faculty […]

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The Higher Education Bubble is Ready to Burst

“It’s a collateralized debt obligation [CDOs] made up out of, like, C-rated mortgages,” said Wesley Yang in a conversation with John Sailer in 2022. “These people, their job is—as the rating agency—to say that it’s all A plus.” Yang and Sailer were not talking about the CDOs stuffed with subprime mortgages and fraudulently passed off […]

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The Babylon Bee Comes to Harvard

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by Harvard Salient on February 29, 2024 and is crossposted here with permission. CEO Seth Dillon gave an address titled “Humor in American Politics.” On February 27th, the Harvard Republican Club hosted Seth Dillon, the CEO of satirical news outlet The Babylon Bee, for a speech titled “Humor in American Politics,” which aimed […]

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Defining the Boundaries of Free Speech: Threats, Libel, and Blackmail in Society

It is difficult to overestimate the importance of free speech. It is imperative for society and even more important on campus. After all, the latter is the place where ideas and the search for the truth are held to be particularly precious. Without untrammeled free speech, it is difficult to see how this mission can […]

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The Potted Plants of Higher Education

Throughout most of the nearly seven decades in which I have had an intimate association with American higher education, I have pondered the question: “Who really ‘owns’ the universities?” Several groups claim at least partial control on many campuses, hence the oft-cited term “shared governance.” But to avoid chaos, some specific individual or group has […]

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DEI-vestment: University of Florida sheds ‘inclusion’ for innovation

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by Blaze Media on March 7, 2024 and is crossposted here with permission. The Sunshine State is now the test case of whether anti-DEI laws can have a meaningful effect in turning back these neo-racist programs. The University of Florida boldly advanced to the front of the academic line last […]

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A Long View on Artificial Intelligence

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by Law & Liberty on March 1, 2024 and is crossposted here with permission. Over the past year, artificial intelligence has become a subject of widespread public interest and concern. This is mainly thanks to new Generative AI models, such as ChatGPT and Bard, which have brought AI unprecedented attention and […]

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No Borders: Higher Education Enables Illegal Immigration

Last month, Laken Riley, a 22-year-old nursing student at the University of Georgia (UGA), was fatally beaten by an illegal immigrant from Venezuela. As expected, the left quickly came to defend the status of what they refer to as “undocumented migrants”—though “illegal” is the accurate term. Janet Frick, a professor at UGA, took to X […]

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Minding the Sciences—Wicked Science and Understanding Climate Change: Uncertainty, Risk, and Pragmatics

Wicked problems need wicked science to, minimally, frame what is puzzling. Wickedness is not a moral judgment. Instead, it is tied to the limits of knowing—when rationality is encumbered by ambiguity and uncertainty and when control over the variables is limited or currently impossible. Predictions that emerge from modeling, especially those that reach decades into […]

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Louisiana is Right to Scrap a Mandatory FAFSA

This morning, the Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education voted to let high school students graduate if they do not file the Federal Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This smart move redresses a tragic reality: artificially increasing college access has meant that young people who ought not go to college are going […]

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Living in the Confederacy of Dunces

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by Law & Liberty on March 1, 2024 and is crossposted here with permission. When A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole came out nearly 45 years ago, it must have been one of the strangest books ever written. Its protagonist, Ignatius C. Reilly, is truly unique: a highly educated philosophical social […]

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The Takeover

Editor’s Note: This story originally appeared in Tablet Magazine, and is reprinted with permission. A massive increase in foreign money and students on American campuses is driving radicalization and subsidizing institutional failure. Something new and peculiar stands out about the wave of anti-Israel student activism that has rocked American university campuses since October: There is […]

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King to Gay: Universities Dismiss Black Plagiarism

Claudine Gay is the present poster child for plagiarism. Although presidents of Harvard University are never too far from public attention at any time, heightened focus on her came about based on her views on anti-Semitism and free speech. A long-time advocate of “diversity, equity, and inclusion,” she saw nothing contrary to Harvard principles in […]

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Let’s Help Harvard Faculty Share in Its Governance

I wrote an article for Minding the Campus a while back titled “Harvard’s Plagiarism Review Process is a Joke.” The article mentioned, in passing, that Harvard doesn’t have a faculty senate and doesn’t have a chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Without a senate, the faculty have no formal representation to approve […]

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Don Juan or Hamlet? Us or Them?

“Men learn in a negative rite to give up the best things they were born with, and forever.” —Norman Mailer, Armies of the Night (1968) William Shakespeare’s Hamlet (c.1599) and Tirso de Molina’s El burlador de Sevilla (1612?) are the most archetypal plays by any Spanish or English playwright from the early modern period, arguably […]

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Estimating the Return to Education Is Still Plagued by Cloudy Thinking

The financial return to education is fiendishly hard to quantify for a host of legitimate reasons, including limited data availability and the need to account for unobservable counterfactuals. But it is also difficult because of cloudy thinking such as misinterpretations, survivorship bias, and faulty assumptions. The best example of misinterpretation concerns the decades-long run of […]

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Why Are Health Care Students Still Forced to Get COVID-19 Boosters?

A tremendous injustice is taking place in health care education, and most people are entirely unaware of it. Today, almost four years since the COVID pandemic began, nearly all U.S. medical students, nursing students, and students training in other health care fields are still being forced to choose between accepting continual booster doses of the […]

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DEI Hasn’t Died: The Rise of Neurodiversity and Multigenerational Diversity

The New York Times recently unveiled a fascinating shift in the landscape of “diversity, equity, and inclusion” (DEI) programs. Instead of the overt focus on race and gender representation, a new trend of rebranding is emerging. Now, we see the rise of more innocuous-sounding initiatives like “culture surveys” and “performance training.” While opponents should rightfully […]

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Yale University Decides It Needs Better Students Again

Editor’s Note: The following is an excerpt from National Review’s article titled “Yale University Decides It Needs Better Students Again,” published on February 22, 2024. To delve deeper into the article, please click here. Earlier this month, Dartmouth College announced it was reinstating its SAT/ACT requirement for all applicants to the class of 2029, after a four-year […]

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