Belling the DIE Cat

Benjamin Franklin once said, “nothing is certain except death and taxes.” Today, though, a third item may be equally inevitable: academia’s diversity, inclusion, and equity (DIE) bureaucracies. Scarcely a week passes without some school proudly announcing that it will now hire dozens of DIE functionaries and spend millions to promote racial justice. Oddly, many professors, […]

Read More

Alexander Hamilton’s Hydras in Federalist 29 & 80

Political Hydras, Part 1 (for Javier Fernández-Lasquetty Blanc) “Such is its nature that, as fast as one doubt is cut away, innumerable others spring up like Hydra’s heads, nor could we set any limit to their renewal did we not apply the mind’s living fire to suppress them.” —Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy (4.6) Among […]

Read More

What Poisoned the Pond?

Three years ago, I began a dangerous journey of questioning strange new policies at my institution, Bakersfield College. Since then, I’ve been subjected to smears, threats, and all manner of harassment and retaliation. The most recent episode centered on fabricated allegations of racism that several national media outlets debunked, but not before one of my […]

Read More

Not Just Semantics: Stanford’s “Harmful Words” Problem Is Serious

‘When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’ ‘The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’ ‘The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s […]

Read More

The Lessons of Hamline University

After showing a painting of the Prophet Muhammad in her art history class, Professor Erika López Prater was informed that her teaching contract at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota, would not be renewed. Those who condemned the professor’s actions believed that what she did was not only offensive to Muslims, but that such disrespect […]

Read More

Unity in Diversity

A new book documents authentic stories of fighting political indoctrination and standing up for America. In the last two years, progressives have responded to parents and citizens protesting critical race theory (CRT), a hot-button issue of the American cultural war, with dishonesty and gaslighting. On the one hand, they argue that CRT’s prevalence in American […]

Read More

The Time is Now to Invest in Conservative Grad Students

Over the past few years, I have regularly encouraged conservatives to not write off higher education. Despite the Right’s valid concerns about woke administrators, progressive faculty, student self-censorship, and hostility toward conservative speakers, higher education is a valuable institution which has promoted an incredible degree of social mobility and ground-breaking innovation. There are many conservative […]

Read More

Science: Are we getting what we’re paying for?

The 1950s were the beginning of a massive expansion of federal funding for basic, curiosity-driven science in the universities. An initiative of the Roosevelt administration, the unprecedented intrusion was floated on high-sounding rhetoric that ultimately prevailed over the concerns of a skeptical Congress. Scientists, so the story went, were intrepid adventurers exploring science’s “endless frontier.” […]

Read More

The University-to-Policymaker Pipeline under Biden

In the acknowledgements to her infamous Yale Law Journal article of 2017, the Biden administration’s hipster Federal Trade Commission (FTC) chair, Lina Khan, thanked Berkeley Law professor David Singh Grewal “for encouraging me to pursue this project.” The article, “Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox,” argued that Amazon should no longer be treated as a private-sector company but […]

Read More

Universities Are Not Colorblind—That’s a Big Problem

In a free society, there would be no strings attached to government funding for higher education because there would be no such funding in the first place. The reality, however, is that federal student loans will not be privatized anytime soon, and since almost every college in America uses them, such schools will continue to […]

Read More

What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Law School

“Sheet music is a bunch of black marks; they have no significance. I play violin, but in order to play well you have to be much more than a violin player. There is an entire world that lives together with it, like the currents in the ocean.” – Ivry Gitlis As a 2022 year-end exercise, […]

Read More

Biden Plans to Turn Student Loans into Delayed Grants

The Biden administration has released its plans to introduce a new income-driven repayment program for student loans. The proposed regulations are as bad as the early indications hinted they would be. For those just getting up to speed, a standard loan uses a fixed monthly payment and a predetermined number of payments (e.g., a car […]

Read More

Anthropology, Human Rights, and Hume’s Guillotine

While reading the American Anthropological Association’s (AAA) Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights, I found myself in a situation similar to that confronted by David Hume some centuries ago. Hume, on reading the leading moral philosophers of his day, outlines the problem in these terms: In every system of morality, which I have hitherto met […]

Read More

How MLK Embodied Our Founding Principles

Nearly 60 years ago, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have A Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. King’s powerful plea for equal rights has resonated with Americans ever since, in no small part because his message was wrapped in an enlightened patriotism. He understood that the best way to fight […]

Read More

Liberty and the Subterranean in the Fantasy of Lewis Carroll

“… everything is queer today.” – Alice P. Oxy. LII 3679, 3rd century AD, with fragments of Plato’s Republic Near the end of Plato’s Republic, a gap opens in the form of the famous Allegory of the Cave at the beginning of Book 7. It’s among the most metaphorical gestures in all of Plato’s work. As such […]

Read More

To the Slaughterhouse with You

“I don’t know how to say it any clearer.” “Got them in my livestock operation and that’s why we put a rope on some of them and take them to the slaughterhouse. That’s a fact of life with human nature and so forth, I don’t know how to say it any clearer.” At the invitation […]

Read More

The Empress Wears No Clothes

Catherine E. Lhamon is the current Assistant Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR). Despite the unassuming title, her position wields enormous power. The Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, at her sole discretion, can cut off federal funding (and has threatened to do so) from any recipient educational institution she […]

Read More

You Are the Constitution

Our founding document was designed to maintain a wall between your private life and government. Modern law schools profit by tearing it down. “A free society is as much offended by the dictates of an intellectual oligarchy as by those of an autocrat.”  – Patrick Arthur Devlin, The Enforcement of Morals “In the social domain, […]

Read More

North Carolina’s Best and Worst Degrees

The James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal recently published a report by Adam Kissel and Harrington Shaw that examines the financial quality of degree programs at North Carolina state universities. The authors use debt-to-earnings ratios, calculated from College Scorecard data, to evaluate the economic returns of these programs. Their report, in addition to providing […]

Read More

Reinvigorating the American Dream with Individual Agency

When a 33-year-old Thomas Jefferson defined America as a land that promises “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” as inalienable rights, he laid out the vision for the American Dream. But as time went on, and as the tiny, fragile nation exploded into a world powerhouse, these grandiose promises were frequently blunted by tyrannical […]

Read More
1 2 3 208