Johnny Bull is in Your Barn: Unfunded Mandates and Property Rights

On June 2, 1774, the Quartering Act became law. A royal governor, if Britain’s North American colonies would not provide and pay for barracks, could now house British soldiers in any colonial “uninhabited houses, out-houses, barns, or other buildings” without consent of the legislature, township, or any American. The sun would not set on a […]

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America the Rebellious

On June 1, 1774, Britain’s Parliament gave assent to the Boston Port Act.  By mandating the complete shutdown of Boston’s port, prohibiting any loading, unloading, or transportation of goods within the town and its harbor, Parliament believed it was sending a powerful signal of its authority to the rebellious Bostonians who had dumped tea into […]

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Reverberations of 1774’s Intolerable Acts

The Administration of Justice Act and the Massachusetts Government Act, two of the four Intolerable Acts, became law on May 20, 1774. The Administration of Justice Act allowed a royal governor to remove from one colony to another, or to England, the trial of a royal official for actions up to and including murder, committed […]

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April 1774: The Pendulum Swings

The nation’s 250 Anniversary is only 29 months away. The National Association of Scholars is commemorating the events that led up to the Second Continental Congress officially adopting the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. This is the sixth installment of the series. Find the fifth installment here.  “His Majesty trusts that no opposition […]

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Thucydides and Us

“You Americans, all you do is talk and talk, and say ‘let me tell you something’ and ‘I just wanna say.’ Well, you’re dead now, so shut up.” —Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life (1983) Twenty-five centuries ago, history’s greatest historian wrote his masterpiece. The Peloponnesian War—late fifth century BC—initiated the Western tradition of analyzing the […]

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‘Linguistic White Supremacy’: The Left’s New Crusade Against the English Language

The fringe lens of critical pedagogy has swallowed today’s academia. Facts are deconstructed, logical reasoning is contorted, historical narratives are rewritten, and causality takes a back seat to the post-modernist project of affirming feelings and identities. Increasingly, words lose meaning and become weaponized for the sake of ideological conformity. Cue the perennial abuse of “white […]

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What I Learned from Being Charged with Blasphemy at the Air Force Academy

Nils Haug’s recent “Misadventures of a Reluctant Convert—Another Whimsical Memoir” essay described his come-to-Jesus moment as a student in South Africa. He concludes that during this experience, “Truth had found me, dramatically changed my life, and I was never the same. My real education was complete.” I’m a few years older than Nils, but identified […]

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Boomer Professors Are Not Based

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by American Post Liberal on June 10, 2024. It is crossposted here with permission. I have been told by some of my students that I am “based.” According to them, I am not afraid to talk about controversial issues and to challenge them to think beyond conventional platitudes. In […]

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College Is Not a Waste of Money, Time, or Talent

College was a transformative period in my life. I held my professors in high regard, viewing them as beacons of wisdom. For most of my time there, I was a teaching assistant and laboratory technician in the chemistry department, a role that made me feel like an integral part of the university community. The camaraderie […]

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UNC Was Right to Call the Cops

Editor’s Note: This is an excerpt from an article that was originally published by The James Martin Center for Academic Renewal on June 10, 2024. It is crossposted here with permission. The recent protests at UNC are only one example of the unrest at several campuses across the U.S.—albeit mostly “elite” ones—in response to events in the […]

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Remembering the Heroes of D-Day

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by RealClear Politics on June 5, 2024. It is crossposted here with permission. After watching “Band of Brothers” in 2007, I began interviewing World War II veterans from Puyallup, Washington, my hometown. Among them were several veterans of the D-Day invasion who described in vivid detail the events that changed […]

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‘Indoctrinate’ New Hires

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by City Journal on June 3, 2024. It is crossposted here with permission. In the fall of 2021, the University of Oregon psychology department petitioned the school to hire an “Assistant Professor with a dedicated research focus in diversity/inclusion-related . . . clinical issues.” The department claimed that its proposal […]

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Rich Students Disproportionally Protest Israel: Should We Fund Elite Universities?

My friend, John Fund, a distinguished journalist and political commentator, has brought to my attention a fine study done by the Washington Monthly, showing that virulent anti-Israel and pro-Palestinian protests have occurred disproportionately at elite colleges where most students come from relatively rich families. You heard a lot about pro-Palestinian demonstrations, building occupation, and tent […]

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Identifying and Refuting Marxism on Campus

Although many of the protesters who occupied college and university campuses around the country had little knowledge of intellectual history, they marched to the beat of philosophical drummers they may not have ever heard. Their chants rhythmically echoed ideologies. The anti-Israel and anti-American passions expressed in pro-Palestinian demonstrations have deep and dark roots, tracing back […]

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The State of Student Loan Forgiveness: June 2024

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by Cato Institute on June 3, 2024 and is crossposted here with permission. Note, this post updates last month’s post. The biggest changes from last month include: Updated total loan forgiveness figures ($167 billion for 4.75 million borrowers) to account for the latest developments. Update on the Mackinac and Cato lawsuit, and the […]

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Lysenko Award, Again!

Author’s Note: This excerpt is from my weekly “Top of Mind” email, sent to subscribers every Thursday. For more content like this and to receive the full newsletter each week, sign up on Minding the Campus’s homepage. Simply go to the right side of the page, look for “SIGN UP FOR OUR WEEKLY NEWSLETTER, ‘TOP OF MIND,’” and […]

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Can Harvard Win Back America’s Respect?

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published by Law & Liberty on June 3, 2024 and is crossposted here with permission. Harvard has had a very bad year. It began last summer with the Supreme Court’s verdict in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, which declared that the university’s admissions policies were unconstitutionally discriminatory—or in plain terms, […]

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Modeling Evangelism for Gen Z Through Missions

Editor’s Note: This essay is the third excerpt from the author’s doctoral project titled “Reaching Generation Z with the Gospel at a Christian University through Faith Integration, Radical Hospitality, and Missional Opportunities,” completed as part of the Doctor of Ministry program at Knox Theological Seminary. The content has been edited to adhere to MTC’s guidelines. […]

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How I Introduced My Students to Personal Finance

Along with a 10-year corporate career, I studied in American business schools for about nine years, culminating in a Ph.D. from Columbia in 1991—Columbia was different back then because I did not need to file a “diversity, equity, and inclusion” plan. Then and now, though, American business schools have been long on theory but short […]

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Inflation Is Not a Monetary Phenomenon

Idealistic, fanatical libertarians—the Mises types, Rothbardian and Randian—like to shout from the rooftop that “inflation is a monetary phenomenon.” But that’s mastery of the obvious. Maybe there are still some five-year-olds out there who imagine inflation to be the fault of merchants raising prices so as to screw their clients and, thus also the fault […]

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Reviving the Conscious Presence of the Social Contract in America

In the heart of every democracy lies a sacred covenant; an unspoken agreement that binds together the fabric of society, ensuring harmony, justice, and progress for all. This covenant, often called the social contract, represents a nation’s citizens’ collective will and shared values. This contract is implicit in our constitutional framework in the United States. […]

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Higher Education Subsidization: Part 2 – Subsidy Design

Editor’s Note: This series is adapted from the new paper, Higher Education Subsidization: Why and How Should We Subsidize Higher Education? Part 1 explored the justifications and rationales that have been used to subsidize higher education. This part explores subsidy design considerations. There have been seven main justifications for subsidizing higher education: Promoting favored religions, […]

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Dear ‘Atlantic’: The Golden Age of American Jews Ends Only If We Let It

This April’s edition of The Atlantic featured a retrospective eulogy by writer Franklin Foer for America’s time as a place where anti-Semitism was rare, and Jews in America were welcome.  Foer describes “Antisemitism on the right and the left” as threatening to destroy the America of civic nationalism that characterized the post-WWII boom and revert […]

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The Federal Dollar Chain: In Debt We Trust

The federal dollar chain is an important civics lesson for college students. It will help answer, “Can I expect to receive Social Security payments? And will the United States of America go bankrupt?” The federal dollar chain is at least seventy-five years long. It is a conceptual tool that begins with taxes paid today by […]

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