Month: January 2022

Harvard, UNC Cases Give SCOTUS Chance to End Racial Preferences for Good

The United States Supreme Court agreed on Monday to hear cases against Harvard University and the University of North Carolina challenging the use of racial preferences in college admissions. The cases could lead to the overturning of the Court’s 1978 and 2003 holdings in Regents of the University of California v. Bakke and Grutter v. […]

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On Distinguishing Political Attacks from Academic Criticism

When discussing academic freedom with university administrators, there arises the question of how to distinguish political attacks from academic criticism. Certainly, there is no simple answer to this question, and the practical use of such a distinction would likely draw resistance from those who wish to impose their political views. Yet universities often make such […]

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Anti-Asian Discrimination at the Heart of the Progressive Education Agenda

Anti-racist discrimination is not a victimless offense. A glaring skeleton in the closet of American education is its intentional and long-established discrimination against Asian Americans, both in college admissions and in access to quality K-12 education. In light of such endemic practices that should embarrass any classical liberal, a federal lawsuit filed by Coalition for […]

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Virginia Bill Targets ‘Hate Speech or Ethnically or Racially Insensitive Expressions’

A Virginia State Senator has proposed a bill targeting “hate speech” and “racially insensitive expressions” in academic or athletic competitions between schools — even at private schools. His bill, SB 285, doesn’t define “hate speech,” though. There are many places in society where hate speech is protected by the First Amendment, and thus can’t be […]

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Jews Don’t Count

When Talking About Diversity and Inclusion, Jews Are Not Part of the Discussion In 1978, the landmark case Regents of the University of California v. Bakke brought the term “diversity” into the lexicon of higher education. Although the Supreme Court found that the University of California at Davis School of Medicine had used an unconstitutional quota system in denying Alan […]

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Disrupting the One-Note Tune of CRT

“The grand fallacy of our times is that various groups would be equally represented in institutions and occupations if it were not for discrimination.” – Thomas Sowell Something is happening in education. It is widespread and Machiavellian. By widespread I mean that it is ubiquitous, and ubiquitous in two ways: 1) every institution, program, discipline, and […]

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Taking Stock of Time

New Year’s is a time when many people, enchanted by the vision of a fresh start, think about time. For those of us habituated to the academic calendar, it can feel more like the hump of the year. I was reminded of its charm, though, in a call last week with a client. He was […]

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Does In-Person Instruction Violate Academic Freedom?

In the twilight of the second year of the COVID pandemic, hysteria continues to run amok. While many folks have gotten on with their lives thanks to vaccines or natural immunities, many others continue to live in fear and demand ever more protections and state interventions. My favorite excuse yet for the “new normal” comes […]

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Professors, Think Tanks, and Chicken Flocks

In the war of ideas, the Right holds a weak hand for the simple reason that it has minimal access to America’s 20 million college students. Yes, Heritage, the Manhattan Institute, and other right-leaning organizations can publish brilliant, wonkish papers, but this reach pales in comparison to the countless airheaded, lefty professors who indoctrinate thousands […]

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Teaching About Systemic Racism: An Anthropological Pedagogy

When I was ready to write up my dissertation fieldwork, I was stymied by conceptual perspectives for organizing my data. What I thought about data collection before entering the field of anthropology had been overwhelmed by the reality of fieldwork. That was in the mid-1970s, when the concept of the ‘web’ of society was giving […]

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The Emory Law Journal Abandons Scholarship for Wokeism

Another year, another incident of fundamental scholarship principles being sacrificed in favor of “feelings” and the woke agenda—and more worthy nominees for the next Minding the Campus Trofim Lysenko Award for the Suppression of Academic Speech. Our latest episode comes courtesy of the Emory Law Journal (ELJ) editorial board, helmed by current Editor-in-Chief Danielle Kerker Goldstein […]

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American Health Care and the Unconscious Bias Bogeyman

Over the 2021 holiday season, Kaiser Permanente, the largest managed care organization in the United States, quietly conducted a mandatory training targeting its California employees in the name of “Providing Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in California.” Filled with boilerplate progressive jargon including “unconscious bias,” “diversity and equity,” “racial disparities,” and “systemic barriers,” the training […]

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The Greatness the Professors Denied

Ten years ago I proposed a Great Books course to my department. The chairman responded with an email noting that in marking certain books as “Great,” I was implying that books assigned in other courses were not great. The problem, in other words, wasn’t the course itself. It was what a course with a title […]

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