NAS

China’s Propaganda Arm on U.S. Campuses

More than 100 U.S. colleges and universities have allowed Confucian Institutes on their campuses. These institutes, sponsored and paid for by the Chinese government, yield a good deal of sway to  China over the curriculum and hiring of teachers, sometimes outsourcing control. As a result, several universities, including the University of Chicago, have closed their […]

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Capitalism and Western Civilization: Liberal Education

Speaking of business and management majors, Douglas Campbell and James E. Fletcher argue in A Better Way to Educate Professionals that their students “should have a strong base in the traditional liberal arts and the physical sciences….to effectively work with people to understand and solve problems as well as to accomplish individual, organizational, and social goals.” […]

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The Radicalization of the University of California

Are the 234,000 students enrolled in the massive University of California system receiving an education or a re-education? It’s the latter–or something fairly close–according to “A Crisis of Competence,” a report just released by the California Association of Scholars (CAS), the Golden State affiliate of the National Association of Scholars. The devastating 87-page report addressed […]

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The NAS & Keeton: Opposition to Preferences Must Be Consistent

NAS president Peter Wood has defended the organization’s handling of the Jennifer Keeton case, which I have criticized on both legal and, more recently, policy grounds. Though I strongly sympathize with the general ideals of NAS, the organization’s off-base position on Keeton, which Wood’s essay reaffirms, has ended its heretofore consistent–and commendable–resistance to on-campus preferences.

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What’s Going on Behind the Curtain? Climategate 2.0 and Scientific Integrity

Cross-posted from National Association of Scholars. Climategate, both 1 and 2, are textbook cases of gross lapses in professional ethics and scientific malfeasance.  To understand why, one must first understand what science is and how it is supposed to operate. Science is the noble pursuit of knowledge through observation, testing and experimentation.  Scientists attempt to […]

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The Campus Left’s Nostalgia Party – RSVP

I head an organization, the National Association of Scholars (NAS), that is often accused by its critics on the academic left of nostalgia for days when higher education was an exclusive club for the privileged.  The accusation is false.  NAS focuses on the enduring principles of the university:  rational inquiry, liberal learning, and academic freedom.  […]

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A Hard Case—Are FIRE and NAS Wrong about Jennifer Keeton?

Hard cases make bad law. Nowhere is that legal maxim clearer than the case of former Augusta State counseling student Jennifer Keeton, who was removed from the counseling program because of her rather extreme anti-gay views. A lower-court judge upheld the university’s actions. FIRE and NAS have filed a powerful amicus brief, penned by Eugene […]

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More From The NAS Conference

Take a look at: Peter Wood’s general account of the conference: “How the Dorms Are Politicized: The Case of the University of Delaware” by Adam Kissel and “The Military And Academe” by Allan Silver

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Not Too Late For NAS

A reminder that the coming weekend will feature a fascinating range of panels at the National Association of Scholar’s general conference at the Washington Marriott. Can you miss Peter Wood debating Cary Nelson on “The Meaning of Academic Freedom”? Christina Hoff Somers on the Expansion of Title IX? A Keynote address from Victor Davis Hanson? […]

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Attend This Conference

If you weren’t aware, the annual conference of the National Association of Scholars is fast-approaching, and well-worth your time and attendance. The conference, held at the Washington Marriot January from 9th to 11th, will feature Abigail Thernstrom, Victor Davis Hanson, Richard Vedder, and the excellent folks at NAS, among others. Take a look at the […]

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Twenty Years in the Vineyards of Higher Education Reform

This month the National Association of Scholars celebrates its twentieth anniversary. Twenty years ago, Ronald Reagan sat in the White House. Twenty years ago a wall stood in Berlin. Twenty years ago the world wide web was only a gleam in Al Gore’s eye. Twenty years is enough time to have fought all the declared […]

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